About Us

About Jardon Eye Prosthetics

Jardon Eye Prosthetics has been a family owned business for over 60 years. We specialize in custom ocular prosthetics, as well as the manufacturing of many ophthalmic devices for ophthalmologists throughout the world.

Our Southfield, Michigan Facility

We are proud to manufacture and customize our ocular prosthetics and other ophthalmic devices in our facility located in Southfield, Michigan.

We are licensed through the state of Michigan, FDA registered, certified through the American Board of Certification in Orthotics, Prosthetics and Pedorthics,  and the ACHC.

Who can benefit from a prosthetic eye?

The most common misconception is that a prosthetic eye can only be made for patients that have gone through an enucleation or an evisceration surgery. The fact is that we are able to custom make prostheses for many other diagnoses including an ophthalmos, exophthalmos and phthisis bulbi. As a general rule, if your injured or diseased eye is even slightly smaller than the companion eye, you could be a candidate for an ocular prosthesis.

FRITZ W. JARDON, FOUNDER

Fritz W. Jardon (standing) finds a match for a patient's good right eye. Today, each patient's ocular prothesis is customer made from start to finish.

Fritz W. Jardon (standing) finds a match for a patient’s good right eye. Today, each patient’s ocular prosthesis is custom-made from start to finish.

Fritz W. Jardon was born in Munich, Germany in 1910. He immigrated to the United States in 1932 and worked as a dental technician in Kansas City, Missouri. At that time he developed an interest in artificial eyes. He then was recruited by the American Optical Company in Southbridge, Massachusetts and became director of the Monoplex eye division of that company. At that time, most of the artificial eyes in the country were made out of glass and came from Germany. This supply was about to be cut off with the coming of World War II. While at American Optical, Fritz developed the all plastic artificial eye and was mass producing them for the numerous cases of enucleation related to war injuries.

While at American Optical, he met and worked with most of the “giants” of ophthalmology (such as Drs. Woods, McLean, Guyton, Stone and A. D. Ruedeman, Sr.) in developing various prostheses, implants, and integrated prostheses. In 1947, along with A. D. Ruedemann, Sr., Fritz won the Gold Medal Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology for the plastic one-piece prosthesis. When A. D. Ruedeman Sr. moved from the Cleveland Clinic to Detroit, he persuaded Fritz to come to Detroit too in 1950. He first worked out of a small office on Madison Avenue in downtown Detroit, later moving to the Kales Building and in 1975 moving to the present office in Southfield.

Fritz W. Jardon (Center) consults with colleagues.

Fritz W. Jardon (Center) consults with colleagues in this LIFE magazine feature.

Fritz gave instructional courses on ocular prostheses at the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology from 1946 to 1969 and received the Gold Key Award from the Academy in 1957. He has also for many years been on the committee for prosthetic devices at the Academy. He has been an instructor with the Kresge Eye Institute and has an appointment of Assistant Professor with the Wayne State School of Medicine. He was the driving force and one of the founders of the American Ocularists Society and was past-president of that Society.

He was twice named an honorary member of the Michigan Ophthalmological Society. He has written a number of eye fitting manuals and co-authored a number of articles on artificial eyes, flush fitting Ridley contact lenses and implants.

Fritz W. Jardon. Inventor, Ocularist and Founder of Jardon Eye Prosthetics

Fritz W. Jardon. Inventor, Ocularist, and Founder of Jardon Eye Prosthetics

Thousands of patients throughout this country and around the world who have been disfigured because of the loss of an eye are forever grateful to Fritz Jardon for restoring them to normality; for his compassion; his diligence and his expertise. Even though he was a pioneer in the development of the plastic artificial eye and the impression molding technique for fitting them, he has always been willing to share generously in his knowledge. He has literally taught hundreds of people around the country in the eye fitting technique.

Fritz remained active well into his semi-retired years. In the mid-1980’s He was instrumental in getting a bill passed in the Michigan State Legislature to license Ocularists in Michigan.

About Jardon Eye Prosthetics

Jardon Eye Prosthetics has been a family owned business for over 60 years. We specialize in custom ocular prosthetics, as well as the manufacturing of many ophthalmic devices for ophthalmologist through-out the world.

Our Southfield, Michigan Facility

We are proud to manufacture and customize our ocular prosthetics and other ophthalmic devices in our facility located in Southfield, Michigan.

We are licensed through the state of Michigan, FDA registered, certified through the American Board of Certification in Orthotics, Prosthetics and Pedorthics,  and the ACHC.

Who can benefit from a prosthetic eye?

The most common misconception is that a prosthetic eye can only be made for patients that have gone through an enucleation or an evisceration surgery. The fact is that we are able to custom make prostheses for many other diagnoses including an ophthalmos, exophthalmos and phthisis bulbi. As a general rule, if your injured or diseased eye is even slightly smaller than the companion eye, you could be a candidate for an ocular prosthesis.

FRITZ W. JARDON, FOUNDER

Fritz W. Jardon was born in Munich, Germany in 1910. He immigrated to the United States in 1932 and worked as a dental technician in Kansas City, Missouri. At that time he developed an interest in artificial eyes. He then was recruited by the American Optical Company in Southbridge, Massachusetts and became director of the Monoplex eye division of that company. At that time, most of the artificial eyes in the country were made out of glass and came from Germany. This supply was about to be cut off with the coming of World War II. While at American Optical, Fritz developed the all plastic artificial eye and was mass producing them for the numerous cases of enucleation related to war injuries.

While at American Optical, he met and worked with most of the “giants” of ophthalmology (such as Drs. Woods, McLean, Guyton, Stone and A. D. Ruedeman, Sr.) in developing various prostheses, implants, and integrated prostheses. In 1947, along with A. D. Ruedemann, Sr., Fritz won the Gold Medal Award from the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology for the plastic one-piece prosthesis. When A. D. Ruedeman Sr. moved from the Cleveland Clinic to Detroit, he persuaded Fritz to come to Detroit too in 1950. He first worked out of a small office on Madison Avenue in downtown Detroit, later moving to the Kales Building and in 1975 moving to the present office in Southfield.

Fritz gave instructional courses on ocular prostheses at the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology from 1946 to 1969 and received the Gold Key Award from the Academy in 1957. He has also for many years been on the committee for prosthetic devices at the Academy. He has been an instructor with the Kresge Eye Institute and has an appointment of Assistant Professor with the Wayne State School of Medicine. He was the driving force and one of the founders of the American Ocularists Society and was past-president of that Society.

He was twice named an honorary member of the Michigan Ophthalmological Society. He has written a number of eye fitting manuals and co-authored a number of articles on artificial eyes, flush fitting Ridley contact lenses and implants.

Thousands of patients throughout this country and around the world who have been disfigured because of the loss of an eye are forever grateful to Fritz Jardon for restoring them to normality; for his compassion; his diligence and his expertise. Even though he was a pioneer in the development of the plastic artificial eye and the impression molding technique for fitting them, he has always been willing to share generously in his knowledge. He has literally taught hundreds of people around the country in the eye fitting technique.

Fritz remained active well into his semi-retired years. In the mid-1980’s He was instrumental in getting a bill passed in the Michigan State Legislature to license Ocularists in Michigan.

OUR TEAM

BRANDON JARDON, APPRENTICE

Brandon, a 4th generation Jardon, is our Apprentice Ocularist. He is the grandson of Paul Jardon, and great-great-nephew of our founder Fritz Jardon. Brandon started working with us in 2016 and is currently in the process of completing his apprenticeship under his father, President of Jardon Eye Prosthetics, Lee Morris. He attends Oakland University’s School Of Business Administration and has plans to graduate in the year 2021. Brandon developed a strong sense of appreciation for art and the field of Ocularistry at an early age. “The relationships I have developed with patients, coworkers, my family, and friends are something that I value highly. My opportunity to help people through Jardon Eye Prosthetics is something that I’m profoundly grateful for.”

LEE MORRIS, OCULARIST

Lee joined Jardon Eye Prosthetics in 1997. A career as Ocularist has given Lee, a graduate of the Kendall College of Art and Design, and a Marine Corp Veteran a unique opportunity to pursue two of his life passions — creating beautiful art and serving the needs of people. Patients travel from all over the United States to trust Lee with the very unique task of hand-painting the fine detail of their prosthetic eye. It is not a responsibility he takes lightly. “Our patients come to us with a very real need. The opportunity to create a match for the patient’s eye, one that truly reflects their pride and personality, is one of the most incredible artistic challenges I could ask for.” Lee is married with two children and enjoys golf in his free time.